Universum releases its rankings of the UK’s most attractive companies to work for

Our strategic partner, Universum Global has launched the findings for the UK portion of its annual Global Talent Survey which found that Google is the UK’s most desirable company to work for by graduates for the seventh consecutive year. Universum studied 39,500 students from 97 British Universities to understand the career aspirations, goals and workplace requirements for graduates.

Whilst Google continued to prove popular with those studying business and STEM, their applicant pool continues to widen with humanities and law students both ranking the organisation in their top two and four companies to work for respectively. The companies highly coveted graduate schemes and internships are in high demand and Google is renowned for rewarding its employees with highly competitive salaries and employee benefits – all combining to make the tech giant an attractive workplace for students across multiple disciplines.

The UK’s Top 10 Business and STEM Employers 2019

Rank Business Rank STEM
1 Google  1 Google
2 J.P. Morgan 2 Rolls-Royce
3 Goldman Sachs 3 Microsoft
4 Apple 4 Apple
5 PwC 5 Jaguar Land Rover
6 Nike 6 BAE Systems
7 KPMG 7 McLaren
8 Deloitte 8 Aston Martin
9 L’Oréal Group 9 Airbus
10 Morgan Stanley 10 Lamborghini

Increased interest in tech and innovation roles is a trend being reflected across many subject areas. UK STEM talent are looking for industries that embrace innovation and new technologies, and careers that will see them competitively and intellectually challenged. As a result, STEM talent are looking beyond traditional engineering roles to automotive and aeronautic employers like Rolls-Royce, Jaguar Land Rover and BAE Systems.

Explaining the move towards innovative, technology-driven companies by STEM students, Universum UK spokesperson, Nicola Kleinmann said “Electric cars, self-driving cars and an increase in safety globally, has recaptured STEM talents’ interest in the Automotive industry. The UK has a rich history of founding some of the best-known car firms in the world which could be why the industry has cemented its place at the forefront of the STEM top 100.”

Moving away from tradition

The move away from traditional roles associated with subject choice is also reflected across the business student market. Where previously banking had been a high career choice, business students are seemingly less interested in the sector as Deloitte slumped two places in comparison to the 2018 Global Talent Survey. Multi-national Morgan Stanley now sits in tenth place after falling three places since the previous year, meanwhile, US firms J.P. Morgan and Goldman Sachs retained their respective second and third places, while tech giant Apple climbed the ranks into fourth.

The wane in interest may be a demonstration of the wider impact Brexit uncertainty has had on the banking industry over the past year.

Universum Managing Director for Nordics, UK and Ireland, Claes Peyron said: 

“Brexit is obviously a factor that is weighing on the minds of young talent when they consider which industry to start a career in. When we conducted our 2019 survey, the deadline for Brexit was set for March, and there was a lot of media coverage during the field period on which industries would be affected the most. Banking is obviously one of those industries, and this could be why we are seeing varied success rates of employers trying to attract business talent, despite their increased talent attraction efforts over the past few years”.

“It was only two years ago during the release of our 2017 UK rankings when we reported that Brexit had no effect on talent wanting to join the Banking industry, on the contrary, more wanted to join than in 2016. However, I suspect that the closer we have gotten to the deadline, the more unsure talent have become about joining an industry where jobs are reported to be heading to the continent.”


Forward thinking

The results show how forward-thinking students are catching onto the fact that UK jobs in the sector are becoming few and far between, creating a challenging environment for those looking for long term careers in the sector.

The wider findings also delved into the media habits of students and found that Facebook, Instagram and most surprisingly, YouTube were amongst the top five most used online platforms used to learn about future employers, ahead of employer-focused resources across both business and STEM students. A huge 27% of students favoured YouTube, supporting the growing trend in how millennials and Gen Z are interacting less with traditional media and official outlets in favour of online and social media platforms.

See the full top 100 lists and find out more about the UK’s Most Attractive Employers 2019 here.

 

 

 

 

Exploring student and graduate perceptions of the working world: Our latest findings unveiled at Milkround’s annual Insight Breakfast

Milkround Insight Breakfast 2019

We had an exciting morning on the 4th July 2019, revealing our newly launched 2019 research into student and graduate career confidence, and their concerns when it comes to entering the working world.

The findings we shared, were from our Candidate Compass 2019 report, where we surveyed over 7,000 students and graduates on a number of topics, including career expectations, company culture, mental health, and whether students feel that employers are being diverse in their recruitment processes – including gender contrasts and how this impacts their perceptions of the future.

For 2019, we partnered with Universum, a global employer branding agency, who are leading in supporting employers through delivering talent market insights. Together, we shared valuable insight on Gen Z and how young people perceive employers and what makes them attractive.  

Milkround’s Key Findings

CC_Key-Findings_2019

 

How to stand out from the crowd as an employer

Claes Peyron from Universum delivered a fantastic presentation on the topic of employer branding, sharing a selection of tips for standing out from the crowd.

With students and graduates having greater options than ever before, it becoming increasingly important to ensure you’re seen as an attractive yet authentic brand to this audience. Universum’s Employer Branding Now Survey reports that differentiation is the number one employer branding priority for the World’s Most Attractive Employers.

How to gain talent through strong employer branding

  1. Revisit your key talent definitions
  2. Become more data-led
  3. Assess your Employer Value Proposition and the activation of this – the UK as a whole is focused on: having an inspiring purpose, having respect for people but also the commitment to diversity and inclusion – which isn’t a key proposition for other countries as a whole. What is most important to your company?
  4. Set long-term goals and KPIs – do you have employee-generated content to support corporate messaging and how is this tracked?
  5. Make sure your offering isn’t too generic and similar to other brands – stand out and have your own voice.

 

Top Tips from Student Minds

We were pleased to be joined by Scott Williams, Head of Development at Student Minds, who spoke about well-being among young people and how employers can best support those entering the workforce, as well as providing insight into their Graduate Well-being Report.

How to support student & graduate well-being and stress for those transitioning into the workplace:

  • Ensure graduates have a manager who is interested in their personal development
  • Provide graduates with someone they feel confident contacting if they are struggling with their well-being
  • Make sure graduates feel comfortable taking breaks during the workday, for example, taking a break for lunch
  • Support graduates in finding the work they are doing interesting
  • Ensure graduates feel able to keep up with financial pressures
  • Check that your organisation is proactive about promoting well-being
  • Allow graduates to feel included in work-related social activities
Source: Graduate Well-being Report 2017, Student Minds

 

To read our full Candidate Compass 2019 report or any of our other research, click here. To find out more, or if you’d like us to delve deeper into our research, contact us at: milkroundmarketing@milkround.com

Students’ perceptions of Brexit and tips for attracting graduates in 2019

Graduation usually comes with a feeling of accomplishment and anticipation but our research shows that 78% of those graduating this year believe Brexit will negatively impact their career.

We explored how today’s graduates feel about the job market and compared this to how graduates faired after the last period of uncertainty, in the 2008 global financial crisis. Researched showed that 50% of those who graduated during the global financial crisis found it more difficult to secure a graduate role due to the crisis – taking an average of eight months to find their first career job.

Ten years on, three fifths (58%) say the 2008 crisis had a negative impact on their career. This year’s graduates fear they will be subject to similar disadvantages as they look to enter the workforce, with 78% thinking Brexit will negatively impact their career and 52% thinking it will be more difficult to secure a graduate role.

Changing plans

With the challenges 2008 graduates faced limiting their entry into their desired career, half (50%) said they had to change their post university plans with three fifths (62%) taking a role in a different sector due to the lack of available roles. Already we’re seeing this year’s graduates taking a similar approach to delay their entry into the job market with 55% planning to postpone looking for their first role. Milkround’s research shows 60% expect they will need to take a role in a different sector, 18% think they will need to do temp work and 9% plan to instead go travelling. The results also reveal a 15% rise in the number of graduates who are planning to take up a postgraduate qualification, rather than heading straight into their career.

Salary expectations

Almost half (44%) of 2008 graduates reported their salary has not increased as much as graduates in previous year’s. The expectations are also set low for 2019 graduates, as over a third (36%) are not expecting standard salary increases post-Brexit. Recent research[1] from The Resolution Foundation think tank supports Milkround’s findings, with those entering the labour market during the financial crisis impacted in terms of wage growth and salary.

Not all doom and gloom

Despite the negative perception this year’s grads have of the current job market, the Office for National Statistics labour market research shows the number of people in work in the UK continues to reach record highs. In addition, Milkround has seen the number of graduate roles advertised on its platform increase by 104% year on year*. A recent report from the Institute of Student Employers[2], supports a positive outlook for this year’s grads with a clear majority (70%) of employers anticipating that Brexit will not impact their recruitment needs. In fact, employers on average anticipate a substantial increase (18%) in the number of graduates that they are trying to recruit this year and in the number of apprentices (47%) they plan to take on.

Georgina Brazier from Milkround noted:

“It’s easy to see the similarities in the job market from 2008 when the global financial crisis hit to this year with so much economic uncertainty. While many graduates are concerned of the impact Brexit will have on their careers, we’re a month out with no clear indication of what will happen so grads should not let themselves be distracted with all the ‘ifs, buts and maybes’.

We can somewhat put them at ease with the knowledge that Milkround is continuing to see an increase in the number of graduate roles advertised on our platform. We also offer plenty of resources to assist graduates in securing their dream role in the career of their choice. Increased competition in the market is not always a bad thing, it pushes graduates to be on top of their game and network more to gain invaluable industry connections.”

 

Insight from a Brexit and Labour Market Economist


Jonathan Portes, Brexit and labour market economist at King’s College London, said
:

“Given the current healthy state of the UK labour market, it might seem surprising how pessimistic 2019’s prospective graduates are about the impact of Brexit. But history suggests that they are right be to be worried. Brexit may well prove not just to be a short-term economic shock, but to do long-lasting damage to young people’s career prospects.

New graduates will need to be flexible and adaptable; that may mean accepting jobs in a different sector or location to their first preference if it gives them a foot on the ladder.”

 

 

Top tips for attracting and recruiting graduates during times of economic uncertainty


Connect on an individual level

Get onto university campuses and connect with students face to face. It’s important to get your company name out there and sell your brand ethos to prospective employees.

Go back to basics

Keep the application process simple and clear. Milkround’s candidate compass survey has revealed job seekers like the basics, with 84% of respondents preferring a CV/cover letter application and 84% citing they would rather have a face to face interview than a telephone or video interview.

Keep it clear

Keep your job descriptions clear of jargon to not detract students and use this as an opportunity to talk about your companies approach post Brexit.

Understand your new recruits

Host a focus group to understand any mis-conceptions students may have about your company which will allow you to tackle the issues.

Look back to move forward

Reflect on your hiring experiences. What are you going to do differently from last year to strengthen the recruitment process? What worked and what didn’t work? Be Honest.

 

For more information on this research, or if you’d like to chat to us about your student and graduate recruitment campaigns, please don’t hesitate to get in touch: https://recruiting.milkround.com/

*104% uplift reported from July/December 2017 to July/December 2018, according to Milkround data

[1] https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-47106711
[2] https://ise.org.uk/page/BlogBrexitImpact

Delving into Diversity & Inclusion at the ISE forum

We recently hosted the ISE Diversity & Inclusion forum at the Milkround offices, where we saw a number of employers talking about hot topics in the industry, as well as the actions employers can and should be taking in order to overcome their diversity challenges.

To kick things off, we heard from Tristram Hooley, ISE Research Chief Officer, who explored the latest ISE Annual Student Recruitment Survey. Among their research, Tristram spoke about the importance employers are placing on diversity, reporting that 96 per cent of respondents are prioritising at least one or more diversity issues, with some being very focused on multiple diversity strands.

More interestingly, the findings showed us that whilst 67 per cent of employers are changing the way they manage recruitment to address concerns about diversity, when looking at how representative this is of their actual hires and the wider population, the results are very different. People who attended state schools, women, first-generation graduates and disabled people are all under-represented amongst current hires. The average proportion of hires who attended a state school, for example, is 57 per cent and the average UK population average is 91 per cent, showing a clear contrast between what is being done and what the overall population looks like.

Social Mobility and Contextual Recruitment

We then heard from Timi Dorgu, Senior Digital Account Manager from Rare Recruitment and Jen Baird, Graduate Recruitment Manager at Hogan Lovells – who spoke about how Rare’s Contextual Recruitment System can transform the hiring decision process and increase diversity too. The system indicates to employers any candidates who have come from disadvantaged backgrounds or those who are resilient outperformers, allowing employers to deliver tangible results when it comes to diversity.

A behavioural science approach to Diversity & Inclusion

Alice Scott from Development Beyond Learning (DBL) shared research on behavioural science, explaining that it’s not always easy to completely eliminate bias and influence from recruitment decision making. She noted that behavioural science can help employers since it looks at how people really behave, instead of how we think they ought to behave.

Alice spoke to us about how removing information with inaccurate ‘representative models’ in application processes or hiding demographic information on forms can help to focus attention to purely just data, which could lead to more diverse and inclusive actions from employers.

ASD Awareness

Lastly, we heard from Nick Heckscher from ASPIeRATIONS which is a Community Interest Company, set up to help employers attract, recruit and retain highly-skilled, autistic talent. Nick spoke about the benefits of employing high-functioning autistic and Asperger’s individuals into a team, with the increased capacity for innovation and enhanced employee retention rates.

 

If you want to speak to us about diversity and inclusion and how Milkround can better your student and graduate recruitment processes then please don’t hesitate to get in touch: https://recruiting.milkround.com/

 

 

Milkround’s latest insight into imposter syndrome and how it is effecting female graduates

We recently delved into the minds of 5,700 students and graduates, to find out about young people’s career confidence and their perception of future employment.

Lower Salary Expectations

Our research identified that one in three (33%) women are worried about low pay and think they’ll earn under £20k in an entry level role, compared to less than a quarter (22%) of their male counterparts.

We also found that males expect to be earning more in five years’ time, with more females (25 percent compared to 15 percent males) expecting to be on £25-£30k and more males (23 percent compared to 17 percent females) expecting to be on over £35k, after five years.

Writer and activist, Natasha Devon MBE importantly contributed stating:

“Imposter syndrome is more than just ‘lacking confidence’. It’s an all-consuming belief that you aren’t worthy of your career achievements, that you’re a fraud and a fear of being ‘found out’, even if all the evidence shows you to be qualified and capable. Whilst feminism has come on in leaps and bounds over recent years, we still live in a culture where the prototype for success and influence is white, male and middle aged. It’s no wonder, then, that the people most likely to experience imposter syndrome are young women.”

 

Career Confidence

While confidence was the top choice for respondents, our findings revealed that far more females (41%) reported confidence to be a soft skill that they needed to work on most to excel in their career, compared with just 28% of males.

Competition from those with more work experience was another concern, with more females (58%) citing it as an issue, compared to males (47%).

Our Jobs Expert at Milkround, Georgina Brazier stated:

“Confidence issues are affecting graduates before they even hit the workforce, which often lasts with them throughout their career.

While more employers are implementing mentorship programmes to alleviate imposter syndrome and boost confidence among new starters, more needs to be done to ensure that this negative mindset is reversed, before they start working their way up the career ladder.”

 

How to Avoid Imposter Syndrome

Natasha Devon has put together some helpful tips to ensure that you avoid imposter syndrome and maintain confidence in young individuals.

Know Your Enemy

Having imposter syndrome can feel incredibly isolating, because by its very nature it is something which makes you feel as though you don’t belong. It’s important to remember it’s both common and, unfortunately, normal – particularly amongst women.

Think like your male counterparts

Studies show that men tend to believe they can do jobs for which they are underqualified whereas women are more likely to believe they aren’t right for a role, even if they are overqualified. Look at their qualifications and experience and measure them, objectively, against yours.

Combat negative self-talk

It’s essential to have a voice in your head advising caution, especially when running away from a bear. The negative voice we’ve evolved to carry around with us is more likely to tell us we aren’t worth a pay rise, can’t do that presentation or will make a fool of ourselves in a meeting. Recognise that voice and tell it to shut up.

Separate instinct from structurally created beliefs

Human beings learn through repetition and a lot of what our brain absorbs happens subconsciously. We still live in an environment which tells us the prototype for a powerful person is white, male and middle aged. Realise this is a belief system is not representative of you and is not something you would choose to believe of your own free will.

Stop trying to be liked

Women, on average, fear social rejection more than men. This isn’t an attitude which serves anyone well in the work place. However, we teach people how to treat us. Working for free, never using the word ‘no’ and letting other people take credit for your work might mean less confrontation, but it will leave you underpaid, undervalued and exhausted.

 

You can find more information in this year’s report. Download your copy here.

*All figures from Milkround’s Candidate Compass Report 2018

 

If you have any questions or would like to speak to us in more detail, then please don’t hesitate to get in touch!

Number: 0333 0145 111
Email: sales@milkround.com

Female graduates can’t see their future in the tech industry

A survey of over 1,000 university students conducted by KPMG and independent market research company High Fliers has uncovered discrepancies when it comes to the career confidence of male versus female graduates regarding careers in technology.

Despite being as equally competent as young men when assessed on digital skills including data manipulation and social media, a mere 37 percent of young women are confident they have the tech skills required by today’s employers, compared with 57 percent of young men.

Adding to the concern raised by these stats is the fact that 73% of females have not considered a graduate job in technology. It seems the existence of female technical talent does not align with career aspirations in this sector. This lack of self-confidence in female graduates has also been considered here at Milkround. Our research found that female graduates’ salary expectations are much lower than their male counterparts. KPMG’s survey suggests that there could be a correlation between undervaluing personal skills and low salary expectations.

Commenting on the findings Aidan Brennan, KPMG’s head of digital transformation said:

“The issue here isn’t around competency – far from it – but rather how businesses understand the underlying capability of an individual and how to unlock it. I think this research highlights the work that needs to be done to show the next generation that when it comes to a career in tech, gender isn’t part of the equation.

Competition for jobs is tough, and we know that female job seekers can be less likely to apply for a role than their male counterparts if they don’t feel they already possess every pre-requisite the job demands. Businesses committed to building a truly diverse workforce need to adapt their recruitment processes to reflect this, and ensure they don’t fall into the trap of listening only to those who shout about their capability loudest.”

Highlighting that many employers do not specify a degree course in their selection process is also important if young women are to be encouraged into the tech industry. By engaging with students from all degree backgrounds, employers can highlight that skills are transferable across industries traditionally considered widely different.

Graduate trainee, Mary Smith, who studied history and politics at university and recently joined KPMG’s tech consulting graduate programme agrees:

“If you look at the subject I studied at University, you might wonder how my background makes me a good fit for a tech career at a professional services firm. KPMG saw something in me that at the time I may not have seen in myself. Now I am in the role, it is clear that the skills that I already possessed are very much transferrable to the job I am doing. I would encourage more young women to not be deterred by jobs which include an element of tech, and to instead have the confidence and belief in your own capabilities to apply and succeed.”

Here at Milkround, we think raising awareness of these issues is not just vital, but absolutely essential. The best way of doing this in the most far-reaching way is by creating event initiatives that appeal directly to the youth market – such as KPMG’s ITs Her Future. Young women must be shown that a career in tech is not just a place where they could flourish in theory, but that they are actively welcomed onto this pathway and a successful career awaits them.

Female graduates’ low expectations contribute to early gender pay gap

New research by Milkround has revealed that over a third of female graduates expect a starting salary of £20,000, falling £10,000 short of the median UK graduate wage of £30,000 per year.

This, coupled with The Department of Education’s Longitudinal Education Outcomes findings, shows that the gender gap exists from the beginning of graduate careers, and even increases over time. In fact, five years into their careers, women earn on average £6,500 less than their male counterparts.*

We believe it is pivotal that graduate employers are dedicated to doing their utmost to tackle this.

Milkround’s Head of Marketing, Francesca Parkinson, highlights that: “Nearly 85 per cent of female graduates do not know their own value, which may have a knock-on effect in their future earnings. As the UK’s largest graduate advice website, we feel a responsibility to empower women in the workplace, helping them to realise their worth and build career confidence”.

As graduate employers, there is much you can do to ensure female graduates know their own value and possess the confidence to articulate this. By seeing that their employers accurately recognise their value and actively  work to erase the gender pay gap, graduates will feel confident that they will receive the salaries they deserve.

Raising awareness of the gender pay gap and its implications as a matter of social responsibility is, of course, a priority. However, only through conscious action that aligns with values of equality can we implement change.

The application process

As a graduate employer, you will know that many job openings will offer ‘competitive’ salaries. You may offer them yourself. Most graduates will embark on their own research as to what range ‘competitive’  consists of for a specific role or sector, but will sometimes set their salary expectations a little lower than the average in a bid to make themselves appear more desirable.

As highlighted by Milkround’s research, this is incredibly detrimental to women, who already face issues of inequality in the workplace.  By being clearer about what sort of salary you will be able to offer, you ensure graduates have realistic expectations and are not undercutting themselves from the beginning when it comes to salary expectations.

Be open to salary negotiations

As you would expect, it is unlikely a new graduate will have negotiated salary previously. It is important to remember this if a graduate with a job offer does not navigate the conversation in quite the same way you may be used to. Of course, this does not mean that it is acceptable for them to raise the point without politeness, accurate research, and proof of their exceptional skills. Simply put, female graduates should feel they can confidently talk about salary.

As an employer, it is key to establish a good relationship and appear approachable to your potential employee so that they can feel confident raising questions not only about the role itself, but about their salary expectations. Often, graduates will give a range for their salary expectations (for example, “somewhere between £23,000 and £25,000”) because they might assume by specifying only one figure, an employer will consider them too demanding. This fear of asking “too much too soon” contributes to the continued existence of the pay gap, and is commonly attributed to women more than men.

Be constructive and offer feedback and recognition

If a recent graduate asks for a raise following an acceptable period of time in your employment, or their salary expectations are higher than you anticipated prior to accepting a job offer, acknowledge that you understand the points they have voiced. Hearing that a raise is not possible will be disheartening, but if employers make it clear that an employee’s request has been thoroughly considered, the response  should be accepted and taken onboard. If you can, use data to reiterate your pay package is on par with the average.

Milkround continually see highly qualified and enthusiastic candidates; our recent Society Awards was host to a number of female students with incredible talent. As a result, it is alarming that young women not only have the glass ceiling to contend with, but also a ‘lead floor’. Without active employer influence, female graduates will remain wedged between the two.

We must continue to raise graduate confidence so they understand their own value and can articulate this. Far from feeling entitled, graduates need to know that even at entry level, they will be respected and listened to during salary negotiations. Maintaining self-worth, especially in female graduates, ultimately forms a self-aware workforce where individuals know their own value. Graduate employees should be able to trust that this is recognised by their employers, who are not only aware of the existence of the gender pay gap, but actively counteract it throughout the recruitment process.

If you’d like to learn more about our research into graduate salary expectations and the gender gap and the graduate market generally, download our whitepaper.

To speak to us about job postings or creating a tailor-made campaign, don’t hesitate to give us a call on 0333 0145 111, or drop us an email at info@milkround.com. We pride ourselves on our graduate knowledge, because it comes directly from our audience!

*https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/619512/SFR_18_2017_LEO_mainText.pdf

Missed our Millennial Insight Breakfast?

Milkround’s ‘Inside the Minds of Millennials’ report is a fresh look in to the minds of millennials told to us by the millennials themselves.

With this piece of research, we’ve gained an insight into this generation which, according to the BBC, will make up 75% of the global workforce by the year 2020.

We look at some common misconceptions around this generation of young workers and ask for their perspective on themes such as professionalism in the workplace, home ownership, travel, employer loyalty, and their close relationship with social media.

To see the key takeaways from the report, click here!

blog-picture

For more information, or to see the full report, just get in touch!

 

Think you know Millennials?

Milkround

We’ve delved into the minds of 1,000 millennials to discover their views on topics from future work prospects, to travel, to buying a home.

Join us on the 9th September at our new home in the Blue Fin Building to hear our findings.

We will also be revealing the results of our annual School Leavers Career Confidence Report – so come along to find out how 2,100 school leavers feel towards their career prospects.

THE DETAILS

  • 9th September 2016
  • 9.00 am – 12. 30 pm
  • Blue Fin Building, London

To RSVP, fill in the form below or email Elizabeth.Hunt@milkround.com by 24th August.

Milkround and SMRS’s ‘Women In STEM’ Insight Breakfast

STEM’s male dominated industry puts women off entering the sector, says Milkround and SMRS research

ONE third of women are put off pursuing a career in STEM industries, as they perceive it to be male dominated, finds new research which delves into the student mindset when it comes to choosing a career in STEM related roles.

With 54% of females believing that women will struggle to earn as much as men in this sector there appears to be a growing gap which employers must address when it comes to diversifying their annual graduate intake and satisfying increasing quotas.

With many companies operating in the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics sectors and looking to take positive steps with regards to brand building and changing the status quo, Milkround the UK’s leading youth recruitment site and specialist recruitment marketing communications agency SMRS delved into the reasons behind the lack of women entering this industry.

Key findings:

  • 23% of female school leavers believe their male counterparts receive more support in choosing a STEM career than females
  • Over 50% of respondents believe that women struggle to earn as much as men in STEM industries
  • 18% more males obtained a STEM role upon graduation than females who had studied in the same field.

This research stemmed from a noticeable rise in employer requests to target females studying particular industry subjects. Over 2,400 school leavers, students and graduates took the time to partake in this research, divulging their opinions and perceptions on the STEM industry.

Following the research, three focus groups were held for each audience- school leavers, students and graduates- to further qualify the results of the research. Another topic was discussed too- that of employer website branding, and how female STEM careerists engage with different types of branding and usability. Students who partook in the research noted that authenticity, friendliness and personalisation such as commuting distance were key factors in engagement, whist stock imagery, impersonal content, and poor user experiences through the application process, were most likely to put potential applications off.

The insight was revealed to graduate recruitment industry experts on the 18th of April 2016 at Milkround’s Insight Breakfast, held at their headquarters in London Bridge. Over 50 employees attended, including representatives from Sky, Thales and EY.

Carolyn Beadsmoore, Sales and Marketing Manager at SMRS said: “The focus on STEM careers, both in the UK and worldwide, is becoming vitally important to ensure organisations have the right talent and skill sets to support their future growth.

 “There are not enough individuals choosing to study STEM, and maybe, even more worrying as our research showed, is that about 50% of those, both male and female, studying STEM subjects are choosing career paths in non-STEM related roles. The focus for this latest research was to understand the choices, and identify any barriers, that women face when choosing a potential STEM career.

 “This has given us the insight to start looking at the opportunities and timings for organisations to connect with this audience through education, engagement and encouragement, with the ultimate goal of attracting more women into STEM roles.”

To see the full report, contact Milkround:

W: Recruiters.milkround.com

E: info@milkround.com